Blog Against Sexism

Well, there’s a couple hours left in the day, so I figured I ought to try to participate in Blog Against Sexism Day. Since I’m not entirely sure what to write about (“sexism is bad” should be a “duh!” thing, and Feministing, Pandagon, et al. do a better job than I could ever do disproving the myth that sexism is gone), here’s a tribute to my parents (and assorted family members), who made me the male feminist I am today.

Thanks to my dad, I do not believe that anything is “women’s work.” He does the dishes and the laundry most of the time, and makes just as good, if somewhat less healthy (pasta and meat as opposed to tofu or fish), food as my mom.

Thanks to my mom, I can not believe anyone who says that women are bad at math or science. She taught me algebra, biology, and chemistry long before I took those subjects. Plus, she beat my dad’s entire fraternity at pool because she was the only one who understood physics.

Thanks to both my parents for not enforcing gender stereotypes when I wanted a baby doll.

Thanks to Grandma Marilyn, my entire family is feminist.

Thanks to Aunt Julie, I know everyone is happier if you do what you want, rather than what people expect you to.

Thanks to Aunt Jenny, I know that women can be (and are) just as aggressive in sports as men.

Thanks to Auntie Suz, I know that women can be (and are) just as aggressive in business as men.

Thanks to Uncle Tom, I think of ear piercings as a sign of confidence rather than femininity, and look forward to spending just as much time with my (future) kids as my (future) wife does.

Thanks to Grandma Tiny, the only southerner in the family, my dad, Auntie Suz, and I have never considered men and women as anything but perfectly equal.

And finally, thanks to both of my grandpas for instilling in me the respect and confidence that keeps me true to my conscience.

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2 Comments »

  1. Your Mom said

    Well, it might not have been the WHOLE fraternity (apologies to Sigma Alpha Epsilon at Willamette University…). Thank you, kid, for becoming the man who can speak with conviction and compassion and reason all at the same time; it well serves humanity–feminine and masculine alike.

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